How Many Questions Can You Miss On The Ged Math Assessment After Levels

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Assessment After Levels

In our school we have been struggling to address the thorny question of how we assess students now that the levels have gone (except for Year 2 and Year 6 this year 2014-5). We recently had a meeting of our local group of schools and we agreed that we would assess children in bands similar to the EYFS ie developing, expected, achieving but how would we put children into those bands. These are the questions we discussed:

  • How do we group a child in year 3 when the syllabus of the English curriculum, for example, covers years 3 and 4 as ‘Lower Key Stage 2’? Do we split statements into 3rd and 4th as one school has done, or do we track children through the two year targets and then decide (on what basis?) whether they have achieved enough to wait at the end of the course Year 3?

  • Without exemplifying materials we are not entirely sure what the claims are in terms of assessing whether children can achieve them. For example, how complex do the problems need to be for 5th graders to achieve this goal? ‘solve multi-step addition and subtraction problems in contexts, deciding which operations and methods to use and why.’ (The National Curriculum in England, DfE 2013)

  • What does it look like to overcome these claims?

  • Assessing whether children have met a statement will be based on teacher assessment and how can we be sure that our interpretation of meeting or exceeding statements is the same as teacher assessments in other schools in different parts of the country?

  • We are nervous about investing in one of the trading schemes offered so far and then finding that it doesn’t work for us.

  • Will valuation decisions change after the next election?

This week I attended a course run by HMI on raising literacy standards with a focus on improving reading. A very important message I took away was that we need to know exactly where children are in terms of their reading age, and not just rely on teacher assessment against the National Curriculum statements. The only way to do that is through a standardized test.

Since last year we have been using a standardized spelling test throughout the school. It provides us with a clear profile of children’s spelling ability. By re-administering the tests regularly, we can measure progress in spelling and monitor the effectiveness of our teaching strategies.

Do standardized reading tests provide an equally clear profile of children’s reading abilities?

The NCLL (National Center for Language and Literacy) has written an article in which they raise issues such as inconsistencies in test results, fairness to children who have limited or different cultural and social experiences, and whether they test the reading skills of higher order They recommend an erroneous analysis because it provides more useful information about a child’s reading ability. I use the PM Benchmark kit with the kids in my class. This involves recording children’s errors as they read a text and then analyzing the errors in terms of meaning, sentence structure or sources of visual information. For example, they can read “I go to the shops” as “I go to the shops”. In this case they have understood the meaning of the word in the sentence and used visual information, but the structure of the word in the sentence is incorrect.

Analyzing children’s errors like this gives a clear picture of their reading strengths and weaknesses.

If they read 95% or more of the text correctly, they can be retested at the next level.

Less than 90% means the text is too difficult. Alongside this fallacy are comprehension questions, both literal and inferential, that test these higher-level skills.

By administering this test regularly I feel very confident about what book range children should be in and also their reading age, which I can report back to parents. The only problem is that it takes a lot of time and the school has to make time to allow me to do it. So far we have only used it in Key Stage 1, but we have decided to move it to Key Stage 2 as part of our new assessment procedures in reading. This, and highlighting the National Curriculum statements in group reading sessions and classes, should help us to be clear when making a judgment about whether or not children are at the expected levels in reading at the end of every year.

Now just write writing and math!!

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