Google Form Add On To Use Responses To Do Math Keep Your Clear Of The Next Pet Food Recall – Here Are The ‘Red Flags’ Of Pet Food

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Keep Your Clear Of The Next Pet Food Recall – Here Are The ‘Red Flags’ Of Pet Food

Last year turned out to be the worst on record for pet food recalls. While there is no way to be 100% sure that a pet food is not contaminated or will be recalled, there are some red flags to look for when selecting food for your dog or cat. Avoiding these common pet food ingredients can greatly improve your odds of purchasing a healthy and safe food.

Evaluating the safety or nutritional value of a pet food starts by ignoring the advertising, the price of the pet food, and ignoring the front of the bag. The actual safety signs of a dog or cat food are on the back or side of the bag or can in the “List of Ingredients.” Regardless of what marketing terms (‘choice’, ‘premium’, etc.) are on the front of the bag or can of pet food, a pet owner cannot determine the quality or food safety unless you look at the ingredients. . With dry food there can be 90 different ingredients (or more), with canned food there can be 50 or more different ingredients. But don’t panic…you don’t have to understand hundreds of different pet food ingredients! Just be aware of a few key ingredients…pet food ingredients that you do NOT want to see in a dog or cat food (or treats).

‘Wheat gluten’, ‘Corn gluten’ or ‘Rice gluten’. These three ingredients were the bad boy pet food ingredients of 2007. Contaminated glutens were found to be the cause of thousands of dogs and cats getting sick and dying. It’s not that gluten itself is toxic to pets—these ingredients have been used in pet food for years. The problem was the source or manufacturer of the glutens, imported from countries with much lower quality standards than the US. (Most glutens used in US pet foods come from imported sources.) These imported glutens contained added chemicals that caused crystals to form in the kidneys of dogs and cats.

Not only is it important to avoid dog food and cat food (and dog and cat treats) that contain gluten because of the potential for added dangerous chemicals, but it’s also important because they don’t add a nutritional of real quality in food. Gluten is used as a thickener AND as a protein source in pet food. Adult maintenance dog food should provide a minimum of 18% protein, adult maintenance cat food should provide a minimum of 26% protein. If the meat source of the pet food does not provide enough protein, gluten is often added to increase the protein level of the pet food. The best nutrition for your pet comes from a meat protein pet food, not a gluten protein. Avoid dog food and cat food (and treats) that contain “corn gluten,” “wheat gluten,” or “soy gluten.”

‘By products’. Byproducts have never been the cause of a pet food recall, but they are definitely ingredients you want to avoid feeding your pet. To give you an understanding of the byproducts, I’d like to compare this pet food ingredient to cakes, you know, desserts! How many different types of cakes can you think of? There are apple pies, cherry pies, chocolate pies, meringue pies, meat pies, mud pies, math pies, cow pies (go ahead!) – I think you get my point. Now imagine if you bought a ready-made ravioli dinner at the grocery store and you looked at the ingredients and saw “cake” listed as the first ingredient in your dinner. Hmmm ravioli cake, what kind of cake? You wouldn’t know if it was apple pie or mud pie or even cow pie. All you would know is that your dinner contained “cake”. Considering “pie” could be anything from apple pie to cow pie, I guess you wouldn’t eat ravioli for dinner. The same goes for pet food byproducts.

AAFCO (American Association of Feed Control Officials – the organization responsible for all animal feed manufacturing standards and regulations) defines by-products as “meat by-products are the clean, unextracted parts other than meat , derived from slaughtered mammals. includes, but is not limited to, lungs, spleen, kidneys, brain, livers, blood, bones, fat partially defatted at low temperature, and stomachs and intestines freed of their contents. Excludes hair, horns, teeth and hooves. . It must be suitable for use in animal feed. If it bears a descriptive name of its kind, it must correspond.”

So when it comes to pet food, a by-product is a general ingredient name. All leftover meat materials from the human food industry are grouped under one ingredient name: by-product. There is NO certainty of what you are feeding – one batch of pet food may be more intestinal by-products, while the next batch of pet food may be more liver or bone by-products. There is NO way to know what pet food ingredient by-product actually contains (the pet food manufacturers themselves couldn’t tell you exactly). Avoid dog food and cat food (and treats) that contain by-products of any kind…chicken by-products, beef by-products, chicken by-products food, beef by-products food, etc.

“Meat meal”, “Meat and bone meal” or “Animal Digest”. These three ingredients are similar to by-products. AAFCO defines meat and bone meal as “the product made from mammalian tissues, including bone, exclusive of any added content of blood, hair, hooves, horns, skin trimmings, dung, stomach and rumen , except in amounts that may inevitably pass to good processing practices.” Again, an ingredient name for the leftover parts of animals that are used for human consumption. There is no consistency with what these ingredients contain (all three definitions of pet food ingredients are similar) – there is no way to know what is actually in your pet’s food. Avoid dog food, cat food, and dog and cat treats that contain “meat meal,” “meat and bone meal,” or “animal digest.”

‘Animal fat’. In 2002, the FDA tested many different brands of dog food (cat food was not tested) for the presence of the drug pentobarbital. Many brands of dog food tested positive for containing the drug. Pentobarbital is the drug used to euthanize dogs, cats, cattle and horses.

How can the drug used to kill animals be found in pet food? The answer: The slaughtered animals are turned (cooked) and the final ingredients are placed into pet food. Euthanized dogs and cats (from animal shelters and veterinary offices) have long been rumored to be the main source of pentobarbital in pet food. However, no one has been able to prove or disprove this rumor so far. The FDA/CVM (Centre de Gestión Veterinaria) developed test methods on two separate occasions to determine the species origin of the drug. Results have never been determined. Pet food manufacturers vehemently deny that they use prepared dogs or cats, but no clinical evidence has ever been published to confirm that pentobarbital comes from slaughtered cattle and horses in pet food, as they claim.

However, the only thing the FDA/CVM has determined through their testing is that the pet food ingredient “animal fat” is the most common ingredient to contain pentobarbital. In other words, if you’re feeding a dog or cat food (or treats) with the ingredient “animal fat” in the ingredient list, you’re (most likely) feeding your pet slaughtered animals. Not every batch of pet food tested that contained the ingredient “animal fat” has been shown to contain pentobarbital, but why would any pet owner want the chance? Avoid dog food, cat food, and dog and cat treats that contain the ingredient “animal fat.”

“BHA”, “BHT”, “TBHQ” and “Ethoxyquin”. These pet food ingredients are chemical preservatives and you may have to look through the entire ingredient list to find them. It’s worth looking into because there is a lot of clinical evidence associating these four chemical preservatives with cancer and tumors (just do a Google search on any of these chemicals). These four chemical preservatives are rarely used to preserve human foods, and if they are, they are used in much lower amounts than are allowed in pet foods. Avoid any dog ​​food, cat food, or dog and cat food that contains “BHA,” “BHT,” “TBHQ,” and “Ethoxyquin” on the label.

‘maize’, ‘wheat’, ‘soybeans’. While there is no scientific evidence that these ingredients are dangerous to pets, they are potentially dangerous ingredients associated with past recalls (1995, 1999, and 2005). These grains are very prone to a deadly mold (aflatoxin). It is suggested (by AAFCO) that all pet food manufacturers approve grains for mold, but as past recalls have shown, this is not always the case. I don’t think these ingredients are as risky as the others mentioned above, but they are ingredients I avoid for my own pets.

Choosing a truly healthy food for your dog or cat is more than just avoiding the ingredients listed above. This is just a start, based on pet food history, AAFCO ingredient definitions, science, and the opinion of many pet food experts, including myself. There are many quality pet foods available that do NOT use the above ingredients and add health promoting ingredients to their food and treats. Continue to learn as much as you can about what you are feeding your pet and ALWAYS read labels!

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